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Tracy Luff



COME CLOSER (NOW GO AWAY)
 

‘When faced with the disposal of mountains of material waste, an easy option is to remove it from sight, have it taken away by anonymous trucks that wake us momentarily in the early morning once a week. To bury it, burn it. In the ‘civilised’ world, it is an easy solution. There is always more if we need it. Always a clean syringe, box, bag, bottle, toy. We don’t need to hold on to anything. Everything is available. Another option is to consider it. To collect it and hoard it. To shape it and change it. To use it as therapy. To meditate on it and find it’s soul. To find it’s new meaning. To allow it to speak and decide it’s own fate.’


The work of Jane Gillings is a simple response to her own affliction. An insatiable hoarder with an obsessive compulsive personality she finds it almost impossible to not make use of her found materials, only rarely discarding the dirtiest and greasiest of pieces. Markets and second hand shops provide mountains of material inspiration while friends deliver bags of plastic relics. Old knitting needles, game pieces, toys and incidentals are sorted and categorised in her studio according to size and colour. ‘If the material can be restored in some way even in the somewhat dubious form of ‘art’, then I have done my work and I can relax. I have little influence on what it will become until I start to study its possibilities and limitations.


Only then can I assign meaning. These forms have private meaning for me and express moods and behaviours we all exhibit in varying degrees. Some are portraits. Some are the inexpressible feelings that sit deep inside. This is how they emerge.’ A box of pink and blue plastic rectangles inspired the work Me and You. The letters ‘M’ and ‘U’, are entwined in an intimate relationship. The viewer is unsure what force is more dominant ‘Me’ or ‘You’? She comments on the fickle nature of our consumerist society. Often we can desperately want something or someone only to, when we obtain that thing we covert, discard it and question why we wanted it in the first place.


Delving into the human psyche, sinister secrets are modelled as spiky and sharp, while the Fleeting Thoughts series are like three dimensional sketches of brief and transient ideas. Come Closer (Now go away) relates to human behaviours, many of which are less than desirable, but we all exhibit them whether we like it or not.
They can draw people in, then put them off. Most pieces are friction fit. Holes are drilled and plastics are inserted and conjoined. From a distance it is unclear how her work is made and what they are made from. The viewer comes closer and observes, then moves away for a better over-all view.


Like her thoughts her pieces are a little jumbled up. Her process, reactive to her materials, is a catharsis of sorts. She allows herself close to the discarded plastics and them to her, reshapes and models them into an expression of something intangible and then moves away from them - onto the next project.

For further information, please email ng@ngart.com.au


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Sometimes You See Right Through Me

 


 
Patricia Casey
JANE GILLINGS
Repeating a Pattern
(and expecting a different result)

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Youthful Experience

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Youthful Experience (detail)

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Black and Blue

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Envy

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
This Wont Hurt a Bit (Just a Little Prick)

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
You and Me

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Naked Ambition

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Naked Ambition (detail)

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Release

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Fleeting Thought 1

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Fleeting Thought
2

 


 
JANE GILLINGS
JANE GILLINGS
Fleeting Thought
3